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Rabbit Breed Description
 
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Scroll down to read details about these breeds, or click on the picture to go directly to that description.

Breed Description

Breed Description

Breed Description

 
To learn about other breeds you may be interested in:

American Rabbit Breeders Association:  http://arba.net/breeds.htm



Mini Rex Breed

History Of The Mini Rex Rabbit

The Mini Rex Breed of domestic rabbit history goes back to breeding the standard Rex to a Netherland Dwarf.  History shows a pair of dwarf Rex rabbits won by Mona Berryhill, of Texas, that had been donated by Marylouise Cowan at the 1984 ARBA Convention in Orlando, Florida. The buck from this pair, was later paired with a small Lynx Rex doe. They produced a litter of 7 kits. Three does from this litter became the foundation for the Mini Rex Breed.

In 1986 at the ARBA Convention in Columbus, Ohio, Mona Berryhill, presented the Castor Mini Rex to the ARBA Standards Committee who approved the working standard for the Mini Rex rabbit. The first official convention entry of the Mini Rex Breed came three years later at the ARBA Convention in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Mona and Ken Berryhill, won Best of Breed and Best of Show that year. Since then the Mini Rex breed of domestic rabbit has become a favorite, loved by both breeders and pet lovers alike.

National Mini Rex Rabbit Club: http://www.nmrrc.net

Appearance

Mini Rex have a medium compact body, a short head length comparable to their ear length.  Their ears shouldn't be over 3.5 inches long.  The coat of the Mini Rex is silky soft like velvet.

Colors

There are at least 14 varieties of Mini Rex recognized by the American Rabbit Breeders Association, and other new varieties being developed by breeders, giving those of us who love Mini Rex a lot of choice.  Agouti markings are undesirable in self colors.  Can be self (solid) in color or broken (spotted).

Size

They weigh around 4lbs grown, but can't exceed 4 1/2lbs to be shown.

Character

Mini Rex are naturally a very calm breed and make them very enjoyable as pets and to show.

Grooming

A Mini Rex rabbit does not require much grooming, if any at all.  They are distinct in their coat of fur is different then other rabbits.  Their guard hairs and undercoat are the same length.  They shed very little compared to normal hair rabbits.  They have the undercoat of fur, which is the soft downy fur on a rabbit, so they are softer then any other rabbit breed.  Giving them the nickname Velveteen Rabbit.



Holland Lop Breed

History Of The Holland Lop Rabbit

The Holland Lop breed of domestic rabbit was developed by Adriann de Cock of Tilburg, Holland. De Cock was an admirer of both the Netherland Dwarf and French Lop. After some trial and error with breeding those two breeds together, in 1951, a litter of six resulted from the third mating of a French Lop doe bred with a Netherland Dwarf buck. In 1952 a doe from this litter was bred to an English Lop buck, resulting in a litter of five. It would take a few more years of breeding, adding English Lops into his breeding program, before De Cock had a what would  later become the Holland Lop. This was now 1955 and he would spend several more years working to reduce the size and produce the dwarf breed he desired. In January 1964, he presented four specimens for acceptance to the Netherland's Governing Rabbit Council each weighing less than 2 Kg., which then adopted a full standard of perfection.

Aleck Brooks was the first to import the Holland Lop, also known as the Netherland Dwarf Lop, from Holland to the United States where it was accepted by the ARBA in 1979. In April 1980, Brooks and several others interested in the Holland Lop formed the Holland Lop Rabbit Specialty Club.

Holland Lop Rabbit Specialty Club:  http://www.hlrsc.com

Appearance

Holland Lop has a medium compact round body, a blocky type head, with perpendicular ears hanging downward.  Their coat is medium length and very soft.

Colors

Holland Lops are classified into eight color groups with the following named varieties currently accepted by the ARBA:  Black, Blue, Blue Eyed White, Broken, Chestnut Agouti, Chocolate Agouti, Chinchilla, Chocolate Chinchilla, Chocolate, Cream, Fawn, Frosty, Lilac, Lynx, Opal, Orange, Otter, Pointed White, Red, Ruby Eyed White, Sable Point, Seal, Siamese Sable, Smoke Pearl, Squirrel, Steel, Tan, and Tortoise. They are shown as solid or broken pattern, however the recognized colors within a group are not judged seperately.

Size

A Junior rabbit is under six months of age and must not weigh less than 2lbs to be shown. A Senior rabbit is six months or older and must not weigh more than 4 lbs to be shown.

Contrary to the name of their cousins, the Mini Lops, the Holland Lops are the smallest of the Lop Breeds.

Character

Holland Lops are very calm, gentle rabbits.

Grooming

A Holland Lop rabbit does require to be groomed.  During the fall and spring when your rabbit is in shed the most, a good wire brush will help remove all excess fur.  Good to remove loose fur so when your rabbit grooms himself, he will not ingest a lot of fur that can cause hairballs.



Netherland Dwarf Breed

History of the Netherland Dwarf Rabbit

The Netherland Dwarf Rabbit was developed in the early 1900's in Holland from the white Polish Rabbit and wild rabbits to produce a small rabbit in a variety of colors. The Netherland Dwarf Rabbit was first given a show standard in Holland in 1940. Netherland Dwarf Rabbits were introduced in the UK in the late 1940s and into the US in the late 1960s. Today the Netherland Dwarf Rabbit is one of the most popular breeds of rabbit kept as a pet.

American Netherland Dwarf Rabbit Club:  http://www.andrc.com

Appearance

The Netherland Dwarf Rabbit has a small compact body, a short neck and a compact, broad head with curved profile. The ears are small, erect, rounded at the tips and approximately 1.75 inches or shorter. The coat of the Netherland Dwarf Rabbit is short and soft.

Colors

The Netherland Dwarf Rabbit is available in a variety of colors including Agouti, Chinchilla, Squirrel, Opal, Lynx, Black, Blue, Blue-Eyed White, Ruby-Eyed White, Chocolate, Chestnut, Lilac, White, Tan, Fox, Sable Marten, Otter, Fawn, Himalayan, Orange, Steel, Sable Siamese, Sealpoint, Smoke Pearl Siamese and Tortoiseshell.  Can be self (solid) in color or broken (spotted).

Size

The Netherland Dwarf Rabbit is the smallest of rabbit breeds weighing just 1.75lbs - 2.5lbs as an adult.

Character

The first dwarf rabbits were more like wild rabbits. They were fearful and sometimes had aggressive behavior. Through selective breeding throughout the years, today's Netherland Dwarf rabbit is a gentle, friendly pet.  They can become timid if not handled while growing up and exposed to things to help with their comfort level.  With their round faces, large eyes and short pointed ears, these rabbits retain their baby-like appearance throughout adulthood.

We have sold many as children sized pets and they do magnificent where they are handled often by us as they grow.  Plus all our Netherland Dwarfs have calm gentle behaviors and that comes out in their offspring.

Grooming

A Netherland Dwarf rabbit does not require much grooming. During the fall and spring when your rabbit will usually have the heaviest shedding (molt), a good wire brush (slicker) will help remove all excess fur. Another good reason to brush your rabbit is to remove loose fur so when your rabbit grooms himself, he will not ingest a lot of fur that can cause hairballs.


 



If you have any questions about one of the breeds we raise, feel free to email us.

If you are looking at getting one, visit our Bunnies For Sale page for availability.



Rabbit General Info: Diet ~ Stress ~ Care Guidelines
CLEANING YOUR BUNNY:
Your rabbit does not need to be bathed.  Rabbits are like cats when it comes to bathing.  Rabbits groom themselves, so a bath is not needed. It could also be too stressful to them if you try to give them a bath. If your rabbit is dirty, just use a warm wringed out wet cloth and wipe clean the area that’s soiled.  Make sure your rabbit has time to dry, before being exposed to a chilly environment.
 
NAIL CARE:
Rabbits need their nails trimmed.  The Mini Rex, out of our breeds, grows the fastest.  If you do not feel comfortable cutting your rabbits nails, you can always make an appointment with a vet.  It is not difficult to trim the nails, you just have to be careful not to cut into the quick, making the nail bleed and it hurts the rabbit. There is medicine you can buy to apply to the nail to stop the bleeding if bad, but if it is barely cut, it will stop bleeding on it's own.
We use small people fingernail clippers to trim our rabbits nails.  They are easier to control where you cut and cut easily, not squeezing on their nails.  Keep the clippers horizontal with the main toenail and you will not hit the quick.
 
LIFE EXPECTANCY:
The average livespan of a pet rabbit is 7-10 years.  If used for breeding, depending on the demanding life of breeding, could shorten the years of life and breeding potency will decrease.
 
FEEDING BABY BUNNY (birth to 6 months):
When on Momma Bunny and after weaned, the babies (called kits) are given free choice Pelleted Rabbit Feed.  Fed in a container small enough they don't use it as a place to sit, as they will urinate and so forth in the feed, ruining it and they won't be able to eat as they need to.
We feed babies an 18% Pelleted Diet and a 16% Pelleted Diet depending on the temperatures.  If it is colder, they will need to eat more fiber to stay warm.  So we use the 16% so they can consume more without over consuming the protein value of the feed.
If you choose to feed something different, then I provide a plastic bag of feed that should last about a week.  In order to transition them to the new feed, mix the feed together over about a weeks time.
Take in consideration, the new home and environment, plus new owners are a dramatic change in a bunnies life.  So you want to keep the diet the same so your new bunny won't have any digestive issues.
 
FEEDING ADULT BUNNY (6 months and up):
Feed once a day, approx. 2 - 3 oz of rabbit pellet feed for a Medium sized rabbit.  Less for a Small dwarf sized rabbit.  Generally, if you feed your bunny and he/she finishes what you gave them, then feed just about half as much more.  That will be what you will feed daily.  You want them to get full and have a little for later.
We use 16% for maintenance feed, and 18% for breeding and feeding kits.
It is good to offer quality hay (dust free), it is important in their diet.  Plus offers them something to chew on when they are finished eating their pellets.
They need fresh water at all times.
If your rabbit is housed outside and the temperature is extremely hot, I recommend you use a pan or tub to water in, not a bottle.  The bottle of water, even cool and fresh will heat up in a small amount of time and they will have boiling water to drink.  They need the cool water to keep cool.  Rabbits can't sweat to reduce their body temperature, so they require a cool location in the hot summer, prefferably with a breeze and cool water to keep cool.  Plus the pan/tub allows them to soak their feet if they choose to, this helps them cool off as well.
 
EXTRA FOODS:
If you choose to feed your rabbit extra foods, I strongly recommend not feeding them anything different then their required Pellet Diet till they are older then 6 months.  Birth to 6 months they are growing the most and need ONLY the Pelleted Diet.  Hay is safe to give as long as they are consuming their Pelleted Diet well.
 
As for treats:  A general thought, if it is green it is alright to feed to your bunny.  Lettuce, spinach, carrot tops, cabbage, sprouts, celery, parsley, etc...Vegetables are a natural food for them, and should always be fed fresh (raw), not cooked or frozen.  Take in consideration different vegetables have different nutritional values.  So feed in small amounts since they get the majority of their needed Diet in their Pelleted feed.  Carrots can lead to health problems if fed too often to your bunny, so offer a mini sized carrot maybe once a week.  You can offer lettuce once a day, approximately what will fit in your hand.  Iceburg lettuce is good for them if they need to consume more water, it has practically no nutritional value, so it is mainly water and something to chew on.
 
ALFALFA  HAY:
If you buy alfalfa for your bunny, note that it is full of protein and fat/energy.  They get their required protein in the Pelleted Feed.  If they get too much protein, they may get diarhea and could lead to lack of appetite and possibly illness.  If they don't get enough exercise, they will likely get fat on the alfalfa hay and become unhealthy.  If you want to feed a chewing hay to your bunny, just get some type of grass hay like timothy, prairie, or bermuda hay.  These 'grass' hay types are safe to give free choice to your bunny for boredom, teeth care, and fiber intake.
 
FRUIT TREATS:
Do NOT feed Treats to a rabbit under the age of 6 months old.  They are generally made of high Fat and Sugar, which will lead to major health issues, such as heart disease.  Causing unexpected premature death.  I don't recommend any store processed treats of any kind due to the health factor and they aren't good for your rabbit.  As candy isn't good for us.
If they eat mainly treats this will restrict much needed growth for a healthy bunny.  The treats will interfere with them eating their required Pellet Diet, as they will refuse to eat waiting for that next sweet treat.
If you do feed treats to an older rabbit and you see they aren't eating enough of their Pellets, then quit offering all other snacks.  Offer only the Pelleted Diet and small amount of grass hay, it may take a day or two, but they will get hungry enough to eat.  The Pellet Diet contains all the necessary nutrition and vitamins to grow bones and muscles for healthy vibrant bunnies.  Everything else is just a treat.
 
FOOD TO GOOD USE:
If you don't like to eat your bread loaf ends, put them in an open container to dry out.  Your bunny will love this as a treat.  Gives them something to chew on, has vitamins, and you won't be wasting the loaf ends.  Feeding amount:  For one bunny feed 1/4th of a piece of completely dried out bread once or twice a week.
 
CHEWING TREATS:
You will need to offer your bunny something like hay or wood to chew on for teeth care.  Their teeth are constantly growing and they must chew on wood/fiber to wear their teeth down.  You can buy a wood chew block from a store or offer a piece of non treated, non varnish, non painted (raw) piece of wood.
 
STRESS & YOUR RABBIT:
Many things can cause stress, such as a change in diet; too many fresh foods added all at once, sugared treats being fed on a regular basis, or different feed being given too rapidly.  New environment, new home, new handlers (owners), noises, traveling, introduction to other animals, the small things we wouldn't think would affect anything, will affect a rabbit's stress level.
If you see your rabbit present any of the following, you need to take him/her to a vet immediately.  If he/she is lethargic (tired), not eating or drinking, has loose sticky stool, or not pooping, has a swollen puffy stomach, grinding teeth, making grunting sounds.  Usually by the time you see there is a problem with a rabbit, they have probably been dealing with something for awhile and you didn't know it.  So prompt vet care is very important for fluids and treatment needed.
If your rabbit is acting odd, like being very jumpy and ancy, more then likely something or someone has been frightening your bunny.  Could be a cat, dog, or even another person.  Find the reason and fix it, as anxiety stress can lead to illness and death as well.
 
When we wean our babies, they are on their own for atleast 2 weeks before we are comfortable with them going to a new home.  By them being without their mom, they feel more vulnerable and have to adjust to being on their own and become more confident.  This transition is much easier, and less stressful, since we let them do it in the environment they were raised in.  Plus they get to see us on a daily basis and soon associate that we are caring for them and become calmer and more mature acting.
 
NEUTERING YOUR RABBIT:
If you plan to get males as house pets and you do not want to breed later on.  You should neuter them around 3 months old.  As they can mark territory when they reach maturity around 6 months old.  Females wouldn't be as necessary to fix, as long as you don't have an intact male around for her to seek.  Female rabbits don't cycle on their own unless a male is around to bring them into season.
 
CAGE CLEANLINESS:
If you have your bunny inside, you will find that keeping the litter pan cleaned once every 3 days to a week is necessary for odor control and cleanliness.
If you have your bunny outside, you will want to keep the cage droppings and hair free of getting stuck to the bottom of the cage.  This will attract flies that will be prone to laying eggs and the last thing you want are a thousand little maggots feeding where your rabbit likes to sit.  Rabbit hair getting built up on the cage can also present a health issue with mites.  If you notice your rabbit shaking his head alot, scratching at his ears, or a crusty build up in his ears... there is a good chance he has mites.  To treat these, you will need some mineral oil (baby oil), disposable cup, and a small syringe.  You will fill the syringe and squirt about 1 cc of oil into each ear.  Even if one ear doesn't look infected, it probably will be since they clean themselves and can spread the mites.  You will want to squish the base of the ear gently if the crusty build up is deep inside.  If the build up is on the outside of the ear canal, just saturate the crusty stuff and then you will re treat in 3 days and then a week after that.  Keep the syringe away from touching one ear to the next, as to not spread any to a less infected rabbit.  You can bleach the syringe and reuse.
CAUTION:  I recommend having two people, as it is much easier.  Cause you will want to hold onto the rabbit, as they don't like it and will shake once you have put oil in their ears and you will wear it if you don't keep them calm.
 
BEDDING:
You can use wood shavings for your cage or litter pan.  DO NOT use Cedar Shavings as they have been known to cause respiratory issues in small rodents such as rabbits, guinea pigs, etc...
You can also use, shredded paper (although your bunny will have fun shredding it more), straw (a little harder to clean up then pellets or shavings), or pelleted litter used for horse stalls (good for odor absorbtion and won't track out of pan like shavings).
 
TOILET TRAINING:
You can train your bunny to use a litter pan.  A good method is to have the entire cage bottom clean smooth surface, and in one corner have a square pan or triangular corner pan with litter absorbing material in it.  Hopefully your bunny will choose that exact corner.  But sometimes they choose their own corner.  If they choose a different corner, just relocate your litter pan.  As your bunny will use the same corner every time.
Trick:  To destract them from using other corners, put something in those corners... the water bowl, food bowl, etc.  Make the only available corner with something to get in to use the restroom and they will use it.
When cleaning the litter pan or cage, make sure and give time for whatever chemicals/cleaners to dry and the smell to evaporate before replacing your bunny.  As the vapors can be very strong and harmful to your bunnies lungs.
 
If I have missed a topic, or you have a special question I haven't answered, feel free to email and ask!  No question is out of the question.  I hope this was educational and you are ready to enjoy your bunny!


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